Grace Card Plays Easter Weekend At Fiske

OAK GROVE — The Historic Fiske Theatre in Oak Grove, La. has slated Samuel Goldwyn Film’s latest religious feature film THE GRACE CARD for Easter Weekend movie and expanded its schedule to include Thursday night.

Show times for the film will be Thursday-Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and Easter Sunday at 4 p.m. to allow for time with the family.  Group seating for churches and other groups is available by calling 318-282-6938 to make a reservation.

“It is always our goal to play inspirational films when they are available and are of good quality.” Theatre Director Adam Holland said. “From all accounts THE GRACE CARD meets our standards of excellence in both story line and cinematography.”

THE GRACE CARD portrays life as it really is, and the struggles we have with wrongs done to us in the past, and the profound moments of letting go, of grace and reconciliation and forgiveness.

Although we see God working through the hearts, actions, and circumstances of people, it is not one of those films that portrays this in a triumphal, miraculous, or unrealistic way.

It’s the story of a Memphis cop, Bill “Mac” McDonald, who, 17 years prior, lost his 5-year-old son who was an innocent bystander when police were conducting a drug bust on their street. “Mac” turns inward and becomes very bitter, a racist and a perfectionist, straining relations with his wife and other son, and has an attitude problem which keeps him from getting promoted as a cop.

Seventeen years later, still deeply embittered and racist, Mac looses out on a promotion that goes to an African-American cop Sam Wright.

Sam has struggles of his own. He is a preacher in a small, somewhat declining Church of the Nazarene congregation that seems to be growing stagnant. Sam had hoped that God would bless his ministry and be able to commit full time to it, but in order to support his family, must remain on the Police force. He’s a pretty good preacher, but God seems to be using him in even more effective ways on the Police force.

Sam Wright and Bill “Mac” McDonald (the racist, embittered cop) are temporarily placed together as partners on the police force.

Despite being emotionally with it, even Sam is deeply hurt by Mac’s non-acceptance, unfriendliness, hurtful remarks and scowling hatred merely because Sam is a black man. As a result it hurts his ministry which wants him to preach forgiveness and reconciliation.

Without giving away too much, it is Sam’s grandfather (played by Louis Gossett Jr.) who helps Sam deal with his feelings, and produces a short letter from his grandfather the 1880s that becomes the miraculous premise for helping Sam overcome his hurt.

A NEW tragedy in Mac McDonald’s family brings Sam and Mac closer together in Mac’s hour of desperate, prayer-fraught need.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s